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ROCHESTER HISTORY

A Sampling from the Archives of the Rochester Engineering Society...1897 - 1966 

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  • 11-Jun-2020 5:57 PM | Greg Gdowski, PhD (Administrator)

    February 2, 1972 (Board Meeting, Bausch & Lomb) (continued)

    RES Employment Committee Chair, Graham Chamberlain announced that a Rochester Area unit of Volunteer Engineers, Scientists and Technicians (R.A.V.E.S.T.) had been formed, and was being led by William Tippy, an RES Member and local consultant. A first meeting of this group, at Monroe Community College, was attended by approximately 150 unemployed engineers, seeking support in their current job searches. This group is being supported by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), under a contract from the US Dept. of Labor. Reporting for the RES Membership Committee, George Landberg announced goals for the coming year of 200 new members, fifteen Participating Companies and five new Affiliates. He also proposed holding a dinner for a selected group of Plant Representatives who will be responsible for recruiting new members in their respective places of work, and he presented the need for a new RES brochure, detailing the benefits of RES membership. The Board approved a budget of $550 for this project. Reporting for the 75th Anniversary Committee, John Schickler announced that they were hoping to solicit a total of $15k - $20k in support funding for this celebration, and they had recently received $7,500 from Eastman Kodak for this purpose. The Board approved seven new Regular Members, two Junior Members and one Student Member. On behalf of the “Operation RESOURCE” Task Force, Ed Anthony reported that they are drafting the final report with recommendations, including; establishment of combined City-County Solid Waste Management Team, acquisition, installation and operation of a shredder, hiring of a competent company to establish a dynamic plan for maximum recovery of resources from solid waste, and that the City & County proceed with recycling operations, a composing system or, if these are determined to be not feasible, an incinerator system. The Career Guidance Committee reported that the RES Explorer Post now has a forty-person enrollment, making it the largest in the region.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (February 1972)

    The RES Luncheon Series for the next four weeks was announced; “A Progress Report on Highway Safety” by W. Russell Laidlaw, Rochester Products Division of General Motors, “A Modular Traffic Signal Controller” by Jerome O’Neill, General Railway Signal Company, and,“How to Plan for a Human Community” by Stewart D. Moot, President, New Wayne Communities, Inc. For the first time in its fifty-year history, this issue provided a complete recounting of the proceedings of the most recent (as of printing time) RES Board meeting.

    March 1, 1972 (Board Meeting, Bausch & Lomb)

    The Board approved the applications of fourteen new Regular Members and four Junior Members. The R.T. French Company was accepted by the Board, as an RES Participating Company. On behalf of the Membership Committee, George Landberg reported that fifteen Plant Representatives had attended a successful Membership Promotion dinner meeting at the University Club. A brochure was ready to be sent to the printer. The Board also approved motions to suspend, at six-month intervals, RES dues payment requirements for unemployed members and to offer a non-transferrable RES Luncheon ticket to each member, upon payment of their annual dues. RES Director, John Schickler reported that he had secured Robert W. Decker, Vice President of General Motors, to be the speaker at the RES 75th Anniversary Engineers’ Joint Dinner, on April 26th, 1972.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (March 1972)

    In April of 1972, the RES planned to present a multi-themed exhibit, “Technology Trip”, featuring sponsored displays with themes including: Transportation (W. Russell Laidlaw of Rochester Products/GM), Communication (John L. Wheeler of Xerox Corp.), Home (M. John Corson of RG&E), Health (Charles Hancock of Castle/Sybron) & Future (Walter Hausler of General Railway Signal). These displays were to be presented for three days, at Midtown Plaza. Two recent additions to the RES Luncheon meeting schedule included; “The World Trade Center” by Seymour Cohen, Tishman Realty & Construction Company and “Operation RESOURCE” by the RES Task Force on Solid Waste Management. An RES-sponsored evening seminar, “Motivation and Human Values” by Franklin C. Basler, Jr., Director of Rochester Downtown Ecumenical Ministry was announced. An article on the VEST Program announced that, as the result of the RES’ support, the Rochester Area Volunteer Engineers, Scientists and Technicians (RAVEST) was up and running, operating as a clearing house for job opportunities, especially focused on providing assistance to former employees of the US Aerospace Program.

    Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II and the Korean Conflict, as well as a hoped-for period of post- war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry, and the ensuing prosperity of the second-half of the 20th Century.

    We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

  • 11-Jun-2020 5:53 PM | Greg Gdowski, PhD (Administrator)

    January 5, 1972 (Board Meeting, Bausch & Lomb)

    The Board approved the applications of eight new Regular Members. Continued concern for the financial well-being of the Society, and the treasurer’s announcement that additional financing would be required, not-later-than the middle of the month, resulted in the approval of a motion authorizing the officers to sell any of the Society’s financial assets, toward reducing/eliminating current outstanding debt. The Board then approved a motion to consider reinvesting some/all of the Kate Gleason Fund, currently all held exclusively in Eastman Kodak common stock, toward increasing its yield. Chair of the Employment Committee Graham Chamberlain, and RES Executive Secretary Norm Howden presented plans to establish a unit of V.E.S.T. (Volunteer Engineers, Scientists and Technicians) to support re-employment of recently-discharged employees of the US Aerospace Program. (Editor’s note: At its peak in 1968, aerospace employment was 1.5 Million (including 235,000 engineers & scientists). By 1972 total employment in this industry had dropped to 917,000 (including 157,000 engineers & scientists). Led by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the VEST Program was a national effort to provide job search office space and travel/relocation grants to laid-off aerospace workers, for seeking and securing new employment. The Board approved up to $50 for sponsorship/implementation of this project by the Society. The Membership Committee announced plans to enlist the services of the Remington/Stockdale Agency to develop a membership recruitment brochure. RES Director Edwin Anthony reported on a recent meeting of the Operation RESOURCE leadership with Hercules Company, to review current and developing processes for reclamation of municipal waste materials. Mr. Anthony further reported that Mrs. Ann Nelson of Eco-Trans has requested that the RES participate in a study of the transportation requirements in the Rochester area. While the Board indicated general consent for this requested involvement, RES Director, Jack Corson, expressed a concern that the RES was becoming a “consulting organization.” RES Director George Landberg expressed the belief that the minutes of each RES Board meeting should be published in The Rochester Engineer toward keeping the membership informed of the actions of the Board.

    January 7, 1972 (Executive Committee Meeting, RES Offices)

    Following extensive discussion of the financial status of the Society, the Board unanimously approved a motion to reduce the RES holdings in Eastman Kodak common stock, to 3,000 shares. The proceeds of this would then be used to completely retire the Society’s indebtedness, retain $5,000 as working capital, with the balance to be reinvested for optimum cash return. The Board then approved this action, unanimously.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (January 1972)

    “Some of the problems that we have today are too serious to wait much longer,” according to Eastman Kodak President, Gerald B. Zornow. Of today’s engineers, he said, “No group is better qualified to give definition to our dreams than the engineers, for they are equipped by ability and training to show us how far our dreams can go.” He further admonished, “And a corollary to this responsible assignment is the obligation to point out to us where the nightmares might be lurking.” He went on, “To those who voice apprehensions that ‘technology has gone too far’, it hasn’t gone far enough, for it has not yet served man as well as it can.” Anticipating a large crowd for Mr. Zornow’s address to the RES Luncheon at the Chamber of Commerce, reservations and advance ticket purchases, at $3, were encouraged. The title of his presentation was announced as, “The New Engineering: Giving Definition to the Dreams.” The 1972 RES Luncheon series was announced including; “Balanced Transportation – Needs and Effects” by Bernard F. Perry, PE, NYSDOT, “Artificial Blood Vessels” by Dr. Charles G. Rob, U of R School of Medicine, “Master Plan – Concepts and Constraints” by Don Martin, Monroe County Department of Planning, “Automobile Air Bag Restraint Systems” by Dr. John H. States, U of R School of Medicine.

    February 2, 1972 (Board Meeting, Bausch & Lomb)

    The RES Finance Committee reported that, upon recommendation of the Executive Committee, 900 shares of Eastman Kodak had been sold, realizing $86,799.70, which was used to pay all debts of the Society, and the balance deposited into an interest-bearing account at Lincoln Rochester Trust Company. It was also reported that approximately one- third of this amount had been invested in convertible debentures of National Cash Register and Reynolds Metals Company, in anticipation of an approximate 6.2% annual yield.

    Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II and the Korean Conflict, as well as a hoped-for period of post- war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry, and the ensuing prosperity of the second-half of the 20th Century.

    We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

  • 01-Apr-2020 5:48 PM | Greg Gdowski, PhD (Administrator)

    “The Rochester Engineer” (November 1971)

    Despite delays in reaching consensus within several of its sub- committees, the “Operation RESOURCE” Task Force presented its Interim Plan, in this issue. The key recommendation was the immediate procurement of industrial grade shredders, to be placed at the current solid waste transfer stations, or at strategically located points, so that only shredded trash would be transported to landfills. “Although the ultimate disposal plan adopted by the City and the County may make use of more sophisticated processes (incineration, pyrolosis, or composting, for example) the time that would be required to place any of these processes in operation precludes recommending any of them for a near-term solution”, the subcommittee said. The report continued, “Principle reasons for recommending shredding of solid waste include reduced objectionable odors, vermin & insects, fires, blowing of paper, volume reductions due to greater density of waste product, enhanced settling of landfill volume, and reduced requirement for landfill covering during off-hours.” On their way to making these recommendations, members of the subcommittee visited sites, and interviewed operating personnel, toward improving their understanding of the options for successfully dealing with municipal solid waste. Upcoming RES Luncheon programs were announced, including; “Who Voted How – And Maybe Why”, by Howard Hosmer, WHEC Channel 10 News, “Electro-Mechanical Shutters”, by Andrew W. Vincent, Vincent Associates, “Engineering and Engineering Education – Programs and Prospect for the Seventies”, by Dr. Richard A. Kenyon, Dean, RIT’s College of Engineering and Applied Science, and “The Impossible We Do Today”, by Dr. Erwin G. Lowen, Bausch & Lomb Corporation. This issue also reported that a 188 page report, “A Metric America – A Decision Whose Time Has Come”, by the US National Bureau of Standards, has recommended the creation of one Federal Agency to oversee this conversion, a project estimated to take approximately ten years to complete.

    December 1, 1971 (Board Meeting, Bausch & Lomb)

    The Board heard a report from RES Director, John Schickler, Chair of the RES 75th Anniversary Committee. It included plans for a professionally-developed, three-day exhibition at Midtown Plaza, “Technology Trip”, showing how the goals of our society can be achieved through the successful application of engineering and technology. Normally held in February of each year, the annual RES Engineers Joint Dinner would instead be delayed and become the lead-off event in this April 27 – 29, celebration of the Society’s 75th Anniversary. The Board approved a budget of $20,000 for this event, to be recovered by donations from Rochester industries that employ engineers. Following a presentation to a group of Monroe County Legislators, Edwin Anthony reported that the final report on this operation would be delayed to early 1972. Mr. Anthony also reported that some 65 boys and their parents had attended a “special interest” meeting for this year’s RES Explorer Post, implying another successful year for this program. Reporting on the RES Luncheon Committee, Roger Kober announced that Eastman Kodak President, Jerry Zornow had tentatively agreed to speak at the January 1972 RES Luncheon, provided that he would be seen by an audience of at least 400 people. Roger Kober also remarked that several special measures, including advanced ticket sales, would have to be taken to ensure this level of attendance. Edwin Anthony reported that the City of Rochester was seeking candidates for Commissioner of Public Works, and that he wanted to form an ad hoc RES committee to interview City Manager Kermit Hill, and to review this appointment with him. By common consent, the Board approved the formation of such a committee.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (December 1971)

    “Delays in the presentation of the final report of 'Operation RESOURCE' should not occasion any dismay”, instead, the community has gained a feeling of satisfaction that a body of unbiased, competent professionals is now involved in the solution of the solid waste problem.” These are the words that accompanied the announcement that it would take a “few more weeks” to reach a solid waste disposal plan for the City and County that will be ecologically sound and economically feasible. An interim plan has been presented. The final, long-term plan will require even greater study, including built-in flexibility, to take advantage of new developments in the field of solid waste management. Meanwhile, it makes sense to continue to recycle all the materials for which recovery channels now exist, and are operating (paper, bottles & cans). New RES Luncheon presentations were announced; “Historic Waterways of New York State”, by Arnold Barben, President of the Canal Society of New York State, and, “Pure Waters for Monroe County”, by G. Richard Sutherland, Director, Monroe County Division of Pure Waters. The RES’ newest Affiliate, the Rochester Chapter of the American Institute of Plant Engineers was featured in this issue. Founded in 1915, in Boston, this organization has grown to 121 Chapters, with over 5,000 members. They have been instrumental in the nationwide development and adoption of municipal codes, the licensing of stationary engineers, air conditioning operation and sewer codes.

    Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II and the Korean Conflict, as well as a hoped-for period of post- war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry.

    We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

  • 01-Mar-2020 5:35 PM | Greg Gdowski, PhD (Administrator)

    Continuing with the historical sampling of the earlier
    writings on behalf of the RES

    The years following "The Great War," into and through the “Great Depression,” continued to be a time of reaching out for the maturing Society, both locally and nationally. The meeting minutes describe a series of technical discussions and presentations intended to broaden the technical horizons of the membership (especially the CE's, ME's and EE's). The RES affiliated itself with a number of National technical societies, adopted local Affiliated Societies, frequently held joint meetings with them and continued taking action on a growing list of public matters. Certain issues of standardization, some crucial to public safety, became the responsibility of the RES and its affiliates. In the pervasive economic downturn of the “Great Depression,” the magazine offered classified advertising for unemployed engineers, technicians and draftsmen and took other steps to try to deal with the crisis. Still, it continued its effort to shape the function, purpose and infrastructure of the City of Rochester, and beyond. World War again affected the Society, taking away many of its leaders while providing opportunities for others to step forward to fill these vacancies. In an effort to provide even greater perspective on the happenings and concerns of the day, a synopsis, featuring selected items from "The Rochester Engineer" has become an integral part of this series. The Second World War and the Korean Conflict are now history, and the Vietnam War has recently become a focal point. These experiences have changed the face and, no doubt, the future of the community. The Rochester municipal leadership and the industrial community have become immersed in the cold-war, growth economy.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (September 1971)

    This issue announced the cancelation of the Fall 1971 “Info Expo”, due to disappointing sales of booth space (the primary source of revenue for the event), probably due to the current nationwide, post-war economic downturn. Plans were announced to re-establish this event as an integral part of the observance of the Society’s 75th Anniversary, in early 1972. The RES announced a permanent change in the printing of The Rochester Engineer to adopt the use of 100% recycled paper, produced from STA (second time around) pulp that still contained inks and resins and clays from their prior uses. The pulp and paper industry was fond of saying that, “a ton of paper, recycled, is 17 trees saved.”

    October 6, 1971 (Board Meeting, Bausch & Lomb)

    The Board approved three new applications; one Regular, one Junior and one Student. The Board heard the final report of the Interim Plan Subcommittee for “Operation RESOURCE”. The Board reviewed the plan and the proposal for its issuance to the public. RES 1st Vice President, Edwin Anthony announced that he had just been appointed to the Genesee Expressway Advisory Committee, recently established by the Monroe County Department of Public Works. He suggested that the RES, in light of its recent activities in the area of Solid Waste Management, might eventually be asked for input on issues Regional Transportation and Air Pollution. RES Director, John Schickler, reported that he would be following up on over 100 letters that were sent to local small businesses, offering them the opportunity for editorial space in The Rochester Engineer, in exchange for advertising contracts in the magazine. It was reported that the RES Luncheon program schedule had been completed, through the Fall, and that three short RES Evening Courses had been schedule for October and November.

    October 11, 1971 (Special Board Meeting, RES Offices)

    The Board unanimously approved the ”Operation RESOURCE” Interim Plan Subcommittee’s Final Report, and urged that it be publicized as a statement of the Society’s position for the interim disposal of municipal solid waste, until such time as the Task Force’s final report and recommendations are issued and implemented.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (October 1971)

    As the final segment in this long-running series of articles on the RES Affiliates, this issue celebrated the 25th Anniversary of the Rochester Section,

    Illuminating Engineering Society. Formed in 1947, with an initial 34 members, the Rochester Section had grown to nearly 100 members, including five corporate sustaining members. The National Society, with more than 10,000 members, in some 100 Sections, sponsored meetings, seminars and presentations on the rapidly developing technologies in the field of indoor and outdoor lighting. The October RES Luncheon Series was announced; “How Deep the Freeze? - When the Thaw?”, by Frank E. Holley, Marine Midland Bank, “Urban Renewal in the Southeast Loop Area”, by Michael Houseknecht, City of Rochester Department of Urban Renewal, “The SOFLENS Story”, by William F. Coombs, Bausch & Lomb, and “The Port of Rochester”, by William A. Carr, Director of the Port of Rochester. Three short RES Evening Courses were announced, in cooperation with the NY State School of Industrial and Labor Relations of Cornell University; “Technology and Citizenship”, by Dr. Christopher Lindley, a current City Council Candidate, “Interpersonal Relations”, by Richard A. Wetzel, Xerox Corporation, and “Organizational Behavior”, Dr. Forrest W. Fryer, Xerox Corporation. In a special message to unemployed engineers, the RES invited unemployed engineers to complete a form that registered them for a re-orientation program to qualify them for re-employment in a different engineering discipline. If response was sufficient, the RES would proceed to initiate such a program in the greater Rochester area, at no cost to those enrolling.

    November 3, 1971 (Board Meeting, Bausch & Lomb)

    The Board approved the Affiliate membership application of the Rochester Chapter, American Institute of Plant Engineers. One additional Regular Membership was also approved. RES Director, John Schickler, announced the rescheduling of “Info Expo” (postponed from November 1971) to April 27 – 29, 1972. Led by a larger, more “connected” committee, the three-day event would include exhibits, seminar programs and an RES 75th Anniversary Dinner. Edwin Anthony reported that there would be a delay in presenting the final report for “Operation RESOURCE”, due to difficulties in reaching total agreement on the findings of some of the sub-committees. RES Director, Roger Kober reported that RES Luncheon meeting attendance had been disappointing, and he was recommending that, instead of weekly, they be schedule on alternate weeks. The Board approved this change in scheduling, beginning in January of 1972.

    Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II and the the Korean Conflict, as well as a hoped-for period of post- war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry.

    We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

  • 02-Feb-2020 5:16 PM | Greg Gdowski, PhD (Administrator)

    Continuing with the historical sampling of the earlier
    writings on behalf of the RES

    The years following "The Great War," into and through the “Great Depression,” continued to be a time of reaching out for the maturing Society, both locally and nationally. The meeting minutes describe a series of technical discussions and presentations intended to broaden the technical horizons of the membership (especially the CE's, ME's and EE's). The RES affiliated itself with a number of National technical societies, adopted local Affiliated Societies, frequently held joint meetings with them and continued taking action on a growing list of public matters. Certain issues of standardization, some crucial to public safety, became the responsibility of the RES and its affiliates. In the pervasive economic downturn of the “Great Depression,” the magazine offered classified advertising for unemployed engineers, technicians and draftsmen and took other steps to try to deal with the crisis. Still, it continued its effort to shape the function, purpose and infrastructure of the City of Rochester, and beyond. World War again affected the Society, taking away many of its leaders while providing opportunities for others to step forward to fill these vacancies. In an effort to provide even greater perspective on the happenings and concerns of the day, a synopsis, featuring selected items from "The Rochester Engineer" has become an integral part of this series. The Second World War and the Korean Conflict are now history, and the Vietnam War has recently become a focal point. These experiences have changed the face and, no doubt, the future of the community. The Rochester municipal leadership and the industrial community have become immersed in the cold-war, growth economy.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (May 1971)

    “What You’ve Always Wanted to Know about Engineers (But Were Afraid to Ask)”, was the title of the RES Annual Meeting presentation by Dr. Lane H. Riland, Director of Psychological Research & Services, Eastman Kodak Company. This being the annual “RES Ladies’ Night” event, Dr. Riland’s address promised to include a psychological profile of the typical engineer, and the ramifications with regard to his roles (Editor’s note: Yes, that’s what the article says!) as practitioner, consultant, supervisor, subordinate – and husband! In the spirit of the RES’ recent “Operation RESOURCE” initiative, the first in a series of public forums, on May 10th, at Monroe Community College, was announced. The featured speaker, Pliny Fisk, inventor and founder of the Waste Conversion Foundation of Croton-on Hudson, was billed as a man to whom “every pollutant is a waste asset,” who claimed to have been working on sensible techniques for waste management for the past 24 years. His organization was currently building a waste conversion plant in Secaucus, NJ, “a fully-automated complex of machines which take sewage solids, unseparated garbage and rubbish and grinds them together. Then it separates inorganic parts, washes them for industrial use, and re-grinds the biodegradable into organic soil concentrate.” RES President, G. Robert Leavitt, announced that subsequent meetings would be focused on other processes and methods of waste management. It was announced that another meeting, this one on incineration, had been scheduled for May 20th, also at MCC.

    June 2, 1971 (RES Annual Meeting, Rochester Yacht Club - Attendance - 33)

    The assembled membership heard a summary of the important contributions made by RES Past President, Dr. Edward Kirkpatrick, whose recent promotion to President of the Wentworth Institute, Boston, MA would be taking him away from Rochester, where he had been serving the academic and engineering communities for the past seven years. RES Director, George Landberg, then introduced Dr. Lane Riland of Eastman Kodak Company who delivered a witty and provocative presentation on the special qualities, and idiosyncracies, of engineers.

    June 9, 1971 (Board Meeting, Treadway Inn)

    The Board approved six new applications for Regular Membership and three for Junior Membership. A proposal by Dr. Harry Sine of the Rochester Committee for Scientific Information, that the RES consider sponsoring an all-day symposium on successfully run solid waste landfills, received considerable discussion, following which the Board approved $750 in funding to support the inclusion of several experts on this subject.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (June 1971)

    In thanking the RES staff and membership for their efforts during the past year, outgoing President, G. Robert Leavitt pointed out some recent successes of the Society, including Operation RESOURCE, the upcoming Fall 1972 “Info Expo”, establishment of a very successful RES Explorer Post, and the continuing work of the Education Committee in bringing a variety of inspiring technical presentations to the Engineering Community. An article celebrating the life-long contributions of RES Executive Secretary O. Laurence Angevine to the Rochester Engineering Community also announced the establishment of a memorial fund in his honor. The RES announced the establishment of a relationship with the NYS Department of Labor and the California Department of Human Resources for the purpose of matching engineers, scientists and employers in the Rochester area with employment opportunities through the use of computers programmed for this purpose. Candidate Registration Forms for accessing this service would be available, upon request to the RES office, without regard to an individual’s RES membership status.

    September 8, 1971 (Board Meeting, Bausch & Lomb)

    The Board approved four new Regular Membership applications, one upgrade from Junior Member and one Associate Membership. Disappointing sales of booth space to local commerce and industry, despite consultation with several local public relations and advertising agencies, caused the Executive Committee to recommend the postponement of the Fall 1971 “Info Expo” to next year, 1972, the RES’s 75th Anniversary. The Board also approved the establishment of a $500 discretionary fund for use by the Planning Committee. A progress report by the Civic Affairs Committee on the status of Operation RESOURCE included the announcement that they would be making a preliminary presentation to the Monroe County Environmental Management Council on September 15th, in advance of the planned November 11th public presentation and recommendation. There was much discussion, in which concern was expressed that the RES must make it clear that the Society is NOT in competition with consulting engineering firms. It was emphasized that the RES would continue to work with ANY consulting firm engaged by the County to develop a proposal for solid waste management, and that ALL materials developed by Operation RESOURCE would be made available to any such firm.

    Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II and the the Korean Conflict, as well as a hoped-for period of post- war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry.

    We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

  • 27-Dec-2018 11:20 AM | Lynne Irwin (Administrator)
    A Sampling from the Archives of the

    Rochester Engineering Society...1897 - 1969

    by Lee M. Loomis

    Continuing with the historical sampling of the earlier writings on behalf of the Rochester Engineering Society, the years following "The Great War", into and through the “Great Depression”, continued to be a time of reaching out for the maturing Society, both locally and nationally.  The meeting minutes describe a series of technical discussions and presentations intended to broaden the technical horizons of the membership (especially the CE's, ME's and EE's).  The RES affiliated itself with a number of National technical societies, adopted local Affiliated Societies, frequently held joint meetings with them and continued taking action on a growing list of public matters.  Certain issues of standardization, some crucial to public safety, became the responsibility of the RES and its affiliates. In the pervasive economic downturn of the “Great Depression”, the magazine offered classified advertising for unemployed engineers, technicians and draftsmen and took other steps to try to deal with the crisis. Still, it continued its effort to shape the function, purpose and infrastructure of the City of Rochester, and beyond. Soon, war would again affect the Society, taking away many of its leaders while providing opportunities for others to step forward to fill these vacancies.  In an effort to provide even greater perspective on the happenings and concerns of the day, a synopsis, featuring selected items from "The Rochester Engineer" has become an integral part of this series. The Second World War and the Korean Conflict are now history. These experiences have changed the face and, no doubt, the future of the community. The Rochester municipal leadership and the industrial community have become immersed in the cold-war, growth economy.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (March 1969) Transportation Planning was the subject of a first-of-its-kind meeting of interested local engineers and Henry L. Pereybrune of the NYSDOT’s Urban Transportation Planning Dept., sponsored by the RES, Monroe Professional Engineers and the Rochester Section of the ASCE. The topics to be reviewed included a potential 72 miles of rapid transit facilities, broad new transportation corridors around the County, new bridges across the Genesee River, and a downtown multi-facility transportation terminal. The RES luncheon series for this month was to include “Securities of Local Industries”, by Warren F. Wallace of George D. B. Bondbright & Co., “A New Concept – A New Company”, by Thomas A. Tuety, VP & Treasurer of R D Products, “Kodak’s New Colorado Plant”, by Howard E. Smith, Manager at Kodak Colorado, “Developing an Integrated Product Line”, by Howard R. Jaquith of Taylor Process Control of the Sybron Corp., and “Training the Undereducated”, by Frederic C. Libby, Supervisor of Vocational Training at Kodak Park. Dr. Edward T. Kirkpatrick, RES President, and Dean of RIT’s College of Applied Science, announced that RIT would be adding a program in Industrial Engineering to its five-year, work-study curriculum. This program would offer concentrations in manufacturing sciences, numerical control, computer methodology and simulation.

    April 2, 1969 (Board of Directors Meeting, RIT Engineering Building) The Board approved the applications of nine Regular Members, one Associate Member and two Junior Members. The RES Finance Committee reported that, by having moved the checking account, and associated RES finances, from Marine Midland to Lincoln Rochester Trust Company, the interest rate on the Society’s outstanding loan had been reduced from 8.25% to 8.0%. It was reported that the Metropolitan Transportation Study meeting at RIT, sponsored by the RES, MPES and ASCE, was attended by 135 local engineers. A report from the RES Task Force P-1, Survey of Educational Needs, had identified three major concerns; current solvency of the RES, the financing future RES programs and the financing of an Engineers’ Center. The Board approved a proposal, authored by RES member John Schickler, making the RES magazine available to the RES Affiliates, for news items, announcements, and meeting notices, for a rate of ½ the cost of an equivalent amount of advertising space.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (April 1969) In his monthly column, RES President Edward T. Kirkpatrick, proposed an alternative to current “continuing education and professional development” programs wherein “moonlighting” instructors from academia and industry in expensive and not-well-thought-out short courses. Instead, Dr. Kirkpatrick proposed the establishment of formal, part-time programs leading to a “diploma of attendance”. These programs, to be taught by regular faculty and industry trainers, would require as much as ten hours per week of study time, sanctioned and supported by employers. The result would be to ensure that the participant would be exposed to upgraded material, currently be given to undergraduates. Dr. Kirkpatrick argued that, with the rapidly developing technology in all engineering fields, employers would see that a better informed and educated engineering staff will lead to greater profitability of their respective companies. The announced April RES luncheon series topics included, “Community Efforts to Solve the Problems of the Disadvantaged”, by Edward S. Croft, Executive Director of Rochester Jobs, Inc., “On Track – The Apollo Instrumentation Ships”, by Gerard L. Abrams, Product Manager of Space Electronics, Electronics Division of General Dynamics, and “Law Enforcement in Rochester”, by William M. Lombard, Rochester’s Chief of Police. A slate of RES Officers for the 1969-70 year was presented to the general membership, for approval at the RES Annual Meeting including, Alexander M. Beebee, Jr. (GM Rochester Products) – President, Gordon S. Rugg (EKCo) – 1st VP, G. Robert Leavitt (Taylor Instrument Companies) – 2nd VP, James A. Clark (Bausch & Lomb) – Secretary, Edwin L. Anthony (Erdman Anthony, PC) – Treasurer, Orlando J. Feorene (EKCo), John D. Cooper (Rochester Telephone Corp.), Paul F. Pagery (Taylor Instrument Companies) & Melvin J. Corson (RG&E) – Directors.

    Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II, as well as a hoped-for period of post-war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry.

    We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

  • 01-Mar-2018 7:17 AM | Greg Gdowski, PhD (Administrator)

    Continuing with the historical sampling of the earlier writings on behalf of the Rochester Engineering Society, the years following "The Great War," into and through the “Great Depression,” continued to be a time of reaching out for the maturing Society, both locally and nationally.  The meeting minutes describe a series of technical discussions and presentations intended to broaden the technical horizons of the membership (especially the CE's, ME's and EE's).  The RES affiliated itself with a number of National technical societies, adopted local Affiliated Societies, frequently held joint meetings with them and continued taking action on a growing list of public matters.  Certain issues of standardization, some crucial to public safety, became the responsibility of the RES and its affiliates. In the pervasive economic downturn of the “Great Depression,” the magazine offered classified advertising for unemployed engineers, technicians and draftsmen and took other steps to try to deal with the crisis. Still, it continued its effort to shape the function, purpose and infrastructure of the City of Rochester, and beyond. Soon, war would again affect the Society, taking away many of its leaders while providing opportunities for others to step forward to fill these vacancies.  In an effort to provide even greater perspective on the happenings and concerns of the day, a synopsis, featuring selected items from "The Rochester Engineer" has become an integral part of this series. The Second World War and the Korean Conflict are now history. These experiences have changed the face and, no doubt, the future of the community. The Rochester municipal leadership and the industrial community have become immersed in the cold-war, growth economy.

    May 17, 1967 (Special Meeting of the Executive Committee – Chamber of Commerce) The Executive Committee approved a motion to borrow an additional $1,000 from Lincoln Rochester Trust Company to meet current operating expenses.

    May 23, 1967 (Special Meeting of the Executive Committee – Chamber of Commerce) The Executive Committee approved the membership applications of seven new members.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (May 1967) This issue announced, “Sights and Sounds of Vietnam,” a presentation by Rochester Times-Union Reporter, Peter Behr, scheduled for the RES Annual Meeting at the U of R  Faculty Club. Sgt. Behr, a 1962 graduate of Colgate University, had recently returned from a six-week assignment in South Vietnam, and provided a recording of an actual fire-fight in which he participated, scenes of the Vietnam War, and provocative thoughts about the conflict. Feedback from a group of RES officers who recently visited the Cleveland Engineering & Scientific Center focused on “thinking bigger” than just creating a place for engineers to meet. Rather, it should provide facilities and support for educational and technical programs of the more than thirty engineering, scientific and technical organizations in the greater Rochester area. RES President Evan Edwards submitted a detailed report stating, “With diligent study, inspired imagination and dedicated effort, the RES should be able to provide the leadership to establish a center and a program appropriate to the needs of the Rochester community.” He further stated, “The Rochester Engineers’ Center should begin to undergo a careful re-appraisal, by men dedicated to bringing it to fruition.” A small article in this issue announced, “Engineers interested in proposal to convert this country to the metric system of weights and measures should be aware that the US House of Representatives is currently considering a bill to fund, at $500k/year, a study on this issue by the US Dept. of Commerce."  The U of R’s Institute of Optics announced a “Fundamentals of Optics for Physicists and Engineers” course for college-level instructors of physics and electrical and mechanical engineering level, taught by U of R faculty, under the direction of Prof. W. Lewis Hyde. This months’ “Our Affiliates” article featured the American Society of Tool and Manufacturing Engineers ASTME, Chapter 16. The Society, formed in 1932 to advance scientific knowledge in the field of tool and manufacturing engineering, saw its Rochester Chapter, beginning in 1938, grow to over 500 members. Also featured in this issue was part 2 of the two-part series on “Reverse-Osmosis Desalination,” by M. E Rowley and N. G. Baumer, covering equipment design.

    June 7, 1967 (Annual Meeting – U of R Faculty Club) Attendance – 39.  A financial report showing a $7,823.21 deficit was presented, along with a discussion of the need for an increase in Regular Members, Sustaining Members, Participating Companies and Affiliates. Following the annual election of officers, the group heard a graphic account, with color slides, of the recent experiences of Times-Union reporter Peter Behr, on the war in Vietnam, followed by many questions. 

    June 21, 1967 (Board of Directors Meeting – U of R Faculty Club) Four new RES Regular Members were approved. Following a presentation of an outline for development of a Rochester Engineers’ Center, by Ernest E. Mohr, the Board unanimously adopted this as an official program of the RES. G. Robert Leavitt, Chair of the Luncheon Committee announced that 26 luncheon meeting had been scheduled, with the first meeting being a presentation by Ernest Mohr on the proposed RES Engineers Center. RES Executive Secretary, Norman Howden was excused from the room, while the Board unanimously approved a $1,000 increase in his annual salary.  

    “The Rochester Engineer” (June 1967) RES Member Ernest Mohr shared the four reasons for his belief that the RES should found an Engineers’ Center:

    People – In 1957, a group of engineers began shaping the RES into an “umbrella” organization that had come to represent the entire local engineering profession.

    Money – The 1936 bequest by Kate Gleason to the RES had grown from an initial $25k to over $200k and could serve as “seed” money for an Engineers’ Center.

    Membership – The RES is unique among professional societies in its demonstrated ability to develop and follow membership practices that allow all professionals, regardless of their education level, to become part of the organization.

    Education – The RES is uniquely positioned to regularly inform its membership of opportunities for keeping abreast of the many new developments in numerous areas of science and technology.

    The U of R announced the appointment of Dr. G. Robert Loewy as the new Dean of the College of Engineering and Applied Science, succeeding Dr. John W. Graham who left to become President of Clarkson College of Technology, in the Fall of 1967.

    An article, “Plasma-Plating, a New Engineering Technique,” by B. R. Catlin, VP of Heany Industries, Scottsville, NY, described a new plating technique, using a hard ceramic coating containing an aluminum oxide base, to extend the useful life of machine parts. The Rochester Section of the ASCE announced that its next meeting would feature a guided tour of the Ontario, NY, site of the new RG&E nuclear power plant, currently under construction. 

    Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II, as well as a hoped-for period of post-war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry. We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

  • 26-Jan-2018 3:30 PM | Greg Gdowski, PhD (Administrator)

    A Sampling from the Archives of the Rochester Engineering Society...1897 - 1967

     by Lee M. Loomis

    Continuing with the historical sampling of the earlier writings on behalf of the Rochester Engineering Society, the years following "The Great War", into and through the “Great Depression”, continued to be a time of reaching out for the maturing Society, both locally and nationally.  The meeting minutes describe a series of technical discussions and presentations intended to broaden the technical horizons of the membership (especially the CE's, ME's and EE's).  The RES affiliated itself with a number of National technical societies, adopted local Affiliated Societies, frequently held joint meetings with them and continued taking action on a growing list of public matters.  Certain issues of standardization, some crucial to public safety, became the responsibility of the RES and its affiliates. In the pervasive economic downturn of the “Great Depression”, the magazine offered classified advertising for unemployed engineers, technicians and draftsmen and took other steps to try to deal with the crisis. Still, it continued its effort to shape the function, purpose and infrastructure of the City of Rochester, and beyond. Soon, war would again affect the Society, taking away many of its leaders while providing opportunities for others to step forward to fill these vacancies.  In an effort to provide even greater perspective on the happenings and concerns of the day, a synopsis, featuring selected items from "The Rochester Engineer" has become an integral part of this series. The Second World War and the Korean Conflict are now history. These experiences have changed the face and, no doubt, the future of the community. The Rochester municipal leadership and the industrial community have become immersed in the cold-war, growth economy.

    April 26, 1967 (Special Meeting of the Executive Committee – Chamber of Commerce) The Executive Committee approved a motion to immediately borrow $1,000., from Lincoln Rochester Trust Company, to defray operating expenses.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (April 1967) This month’s RES Evening Meeting, hosted by Friden, Inc. at their plant on Humboldt St., featured the new Friden “Conversational Mode Terminal”, which allows keyboarding directly into a computer, with hard-copy output! RES Luncheon topic, “Building an New Rochester”, by Seymour Scher, Rochester City Manager, covered challenges to the City Administration, including express highways, rapid transit, urban renewal, new City, County & Federal Offices, air, truck & train terminals, and the Genesee River. Study, along with much discussion continued regarding the proposed new RES Engineers Center. Members wrote to the magazine expressing concern that locating such a center in a renovated facility (the Krenzer Barn on the new RIT Campus in Henrietta), “on the southern outskirts of the City”, would not, “reflect the dynamics of which the Rochester engineering community is capable.” By action of its Board of Directors, the Monroe Professional Engineers Society became the 15th Affiliate of the RES. This month’s RES Affiliate article described the Rochester of the American Society of Chemical Engineers. Founded in 1908, the AIChE began encouraging the establishment of local chapters and, in 1943, the Rochester Chemical Engineers Club was formed, becoming an official Chapter in 1946 and hosting the 1951 annual National AIChE Meeting, in Rochester. The slate of RES Officers, presented in this issue, included President – John L. Wheeler, Xerox Corp., 1st Vice President – Dr. Edward T. Kirkpatrick, RIT, 2nd Vice President – Alexander M. Beebee, Jr., Rochester Products Division of General Motors, Secretary – Gordon S. Rugg, Eastman Kodak Co., Treasurer – E. Philip Kron, Eastman Kodak Co. Directors – Cecil l. Wilder, Xerox Corp. and G.R. (Bob) Leavitt, Taylor Instrument Companies. An article, “Desalination of Water by Reverse Osmosis”, by Dr. M.E. Rowley and N. G. Baumer of Eastman Kodak Co., discussed the First International Symposium on Water Desalination, held in 1965 in Washington, DC. and reviewed the contributions made by Kodak’s Polymer Technology Division to the development of cellulose acetate membranes to support, and enhance the reverse osmosis process. Included in this month’s RES Affiliate meeting topics were “Power Train Development of the Bell “Huey” Helicopter” (Society of Automotive Engineers), “The Digital Computer as a Laboratory Instrument” (IEEE) and “The Design and Construction of the NASA Vehicle Assembly Building” (ASCE).

    May 3, 1967 (Board of Directors Meeting – Rochester Products Div. G.M. Corp) The Board heard a report that the Society would end this year (1966-67) with a deficit of $8,000., instead of the $3,600 forecasted. This was largely due to the unbudgeted purchase of the display panels for the Engineers’ Week exhibit, architect’s fees for the designs for the Engineers’ Center and shortfalls in expected income from the Seminars and “The Rochester Engineer”. The Board approved a motion to terminate the RES Custodian Account with Lincoln Rochester Trust Company, with its $200 annual fee. The Board approved a motion to increase annual RES dues from $20 to $25., effective with the new year (1967-68). The Board also approved the membership applications of seven new members. A letter of resignation from Dr. John W. Graham (Past RES President, now President of Clarkson College of Technology) was rejected, in favor of having RES Executive Director, Norm Howden, write and invite Dr. Graham to consider becoming an RES Sustaining Member, or else a non-resident member. RES President Evan Edwards introduced Ernest Mohr, Asst. Mgr. Engineering, Construction, Maintenance & Utilities (ECM&U), Eastman Kodak Co., who had recently accepted the Board’s appointment as the Project Manager for the RES Engineers’ Center. Mr. Mohr then addressed the Board regarding the RES, as a “unifying force” for the Rochester engineering community. Key to this effort, he said, “would be the RES’ sponsorship of continuing education for its members, an acute need that was not currently being met.” He expressed the conviction that a demonstration of this need, and the RES’ ability to meet this need was a pre-condition to securing funding for, and establishing an RES Engineers’ Center. He then proposed that a step-by-step plan be developed to address this challenge. The Publications Committee Chair, Ray Hasenauer, announced that the first significant changes in the format of “The Rochester Engineer” would appear in the May 1967 issue, and that magazine subscription rates would increase with the July-August issue.

    Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II, as well as a hoped-for period of post-war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry.

    We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

  • 11-Jan-2018 7:48 PM | Greg Gdowski, PhD (Administrator)

    Continuing with the historical sampling of the earlier writings on behalf of the Rochester Engineering Society, the years following "The Great War," into and through the “Great Depression,” continued to be a time of reaching out for the maturing Society, both locally and nationally.  The meeting minutes describe a series of technical discussions and presentations intended to broaden the technical horizons of the membership (especially the CE's, ME's and EE's).  The RES affiliated itself with a number of National technical societies, adopted local Affiliated Societies, frequently held joint meetings with them and continued taking action on a growing list of public matters. Certain issues of standardization, some crucial to public safety, became the responsibility of the RES and its affiliates. In the pervasive economic downturn of the “Great Depression,” the magazine offered classified advertising for unemployed engineers, technicians and draftsmen and took other steps to try to deal with the crisis. Still, it continued its effort to shape the function, purpose and infrastructure of the City of Rochester, and beyond. Soon, war would again affect the Society, taking away many of its leaders while providing opportunities for others to step forward to fill these vacancies.  In an effort to provide even greater perspective on the happenings and concerns of the day, a synopsis, featuring selected items from "The Rochester Engineer" has become an integral part of this series. The Second World War and the Korean Conflict are now history. These experiences have changed the face and, no doubt, the future of the community. The Rochester municipal leadership and the industrial community have become immersed in the cold-war, growth economy.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (February 1967) (continued) This issue provided the seventh article in its series, “Our Affiliates,” this time featuring the Rochester Section, ASME. Having become one of the first RES Affiliates, the Rochester Section, one of over 150 such ASME groups, had grown to over 450 members by 1967. RES Affiliates, and other technical organizations’ activities for the month included: American Society for Metals - “The F-111 Aircraft”, American Society for Quality Control – “Liars, Engineers & Statisticians” and American Institute of Chemical Engineers – “Happiness is Assuming Everyone is Ethical.” This issue also provided information on five public sector engineering position openings, including four opportunities at the City of Rochester Bureau of Buildings and an airport engineer at the County of Monroe.

    March 1, 1967 (Board of Directors Meeting - U of R Faculty Club) The Board approved nine new membership applications. The Board received a report on a survey of the interests and needs in the Rochester area for an Engineers’ Center. A recommendation was made that the RES seek professional with for funding and membership campaigns. An additional suggestion was made that a project manager be selected for such a project. Questions were raised regarding location, renovation costs, adequacy of meeting facilities and the challenge of increasing membership (by over 2000), in such a short timeframe. This resulted in a brief review of several possible locations/facilities in the Rochester area, considered in recent years, all of which had been rejected by the Executive Committee, for various reasons. There then ensued an extended discussion of the procedure to be followed in this project, culminating in a single decision; to design and produce a brochure describing the Engineers’ Center Project, for use in soliciting support. A motion was then made, and passed, that a delegation from the RES be appointed to visit at least six similar engineers’ centers, toward gathering input from others’ experiences. The Awards Committee reported, presenting a  motion, proposing several changes to the guidelines/requirements for selecting the “Engineer of the Year,” including participation in local (or national) engineering societies, full- time practice (or management) in engineering, residents of Monroe (or adjacent) Counties, nominations could come from RES Affiliates or RES individual members, and that no posthumous awards should be made. The Publications Committee reported that a discussion had been held and an offer made to a possible vendor, regarding hiring them to publish The Rochester Engineer, but that it had been declined. Instead, the Board decided that the current revenue shortfalls could be overcome with a concerted effort to increase advertising.

    March 29, 1967 (Special Meeting of the Board of Directors – Chamber of Commerce) The Board approved a slate of RES officers for 1967-68 including: President – John L. Wheeler (Xerox), 1st VP – Dr. Edward Kirkpatrick (RIT), 2nd VP – Alexander M. Beebee (GM), Jr., Secretary – Gordon S. Rugg (EKCo), Treasurer – E. Philip Kron (EKCo), Directors – Cecil L. Wilder (Xerox) & G. Robert Leavitt (Taylor Instrument).

    “The Rochester Engineer” (March 1967)
    At the annual Engineers’ Joint Dinner, the Leo H. East Memorial Award for “1966 Engineer of the Year” was presented to Harold S. Mosher, director of engineering at Kodak Park. Architect Kevin Walsh’s rendering of the remodeled RIT Krenzer Barn as the proposed RES Engineers’ Center, was revealed by RES Engineers’ Center Committee Chair, Alexander M. Beebee, Jr., at this dinner, held at the Rochester Chamber of Commerce. Further planning, including methods of financing the estimated $300,000 development cost would be undertaken by the RES Board of Directors.

    April 5, 1967 (Board of Directors Meeting - U of R Faculty Club) The Board heard a report from an RES delegation that had recently visited the Cleveland Engineering & Scientific Center. There was consensus that, of paramount importance to the success of such a facility in Rochester would be a set of well-defined goals for its purpose and use. The Board approved a motion to increase RES annual dues to $25. Eleven new applications for RES membership were approved, including Phil T. Elliott, Ernest E. Mohr and Francis S. Nayman. The Civic Affairs Committee reported on two urgent issues; air pollution and monumentation in Monroe County.  It was further explained that air quality in Rochester and Monroe County had decreased alarmingly in the past decade, and that land surveyors had reported that many permanent monuments had been destroyed by extensive recent construction work, without being replaced. The Publications Committee reported that it was considering a format change in The Rochester Engineer. Specifically, local industry would be asked to supply a cover photo, with an appropriate article of interest to be published in the same issue, and the calendar of engineering meetings and events would be moved to the center of the magazine.

    Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War\ II, as well as a hoped-for period of post-war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry.

    We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

  • 11-Dec-2017 7:35 PM | Greg Gdowski, PhD (Administrator)

    Continuing with the historical sampling of the earlier writings on behalf of the Rochester Engineering Society, the years following "The Great War," into and through the “Great Depression,” continued to be a time of reaching out for the maturing Society, both locally and nationally.  The meeting minutes describe a series of technical discussions and presentations intended to broaden the technical horizons of the membership (especially the CE's, ME's and EE's).  The RES affiliated itself with a number of National technical societies, adopted local Affiliated Societies, frequently held joint meetings with them and continued taking action on a growing list of public matters. Certain issues of standardization, some crucial to public safety, became the responsibility of the RES and its affiliates. In the pervasive economic downturn of the “Great Depression,” the magazine offered classified advertising for unemployed engineers, technicians and draftsmen and took other steps to try to deal with the crisis. Still, it continued its effort to shape the function, purpose and infrastructure of the City of Rochester, and beyond. Soon, war would again affect the Society, taking away many of its leaders while providing opportunities for others to step forward to fill these vacancies.  In an effort to provide even greater perspective on the happenings and concerns of the day, a synopsis, featuring selected items from "The Rochester Engineer" has become an integral part of this series. The Second World War and the Korean Conflict are now history. These experiences have changed the face and, no doubt, the future of the community. The Rochester municipal leadership and the industrial community have become immersed  in the cold-war, growth economy.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (December 1966)
    This issue brought to the attention of readers, a meeting of all engineers to hear about proposed changes in NY State Education Law governing the licensing and practice of engineering. Among the more controversial new provisions, misdemeanor-level penalties to be imposed upon engineers who attempt to practice without being Registered. Reducing the licensing examination to two parts, with the second being an optional choice of branch of engineering, and the establishment of precise definitions of work that may be performed by Land Surveyors. Additional RES luncheon topics were announced for January, February and March, including “Holography” by William F. Coombs of Bausch & Lomb, “High Speed Photography” by Fred W. Emens of Wollensak, “Galloping Glaciers” by Prof. Sam G. Collins of RIT, “The Super-8 Movie System” by Evan A. Edwards of Eastman Kodak Co., “Public Transportation in Rochester” by William A. Lang of Rochester Transit Corp. and “Ocean Engineering” by Dr. John Myers of General Dymanics/Electronics. Among the newest RES members to be announced were: Realto E. Cherne, Edward M. Maybeck and John F. Morgan. The sixth in a series of articles on RES Affiliates featured the Genesee Valley Chapter of the American Society of Safety Engineers. Founded in 1951, it sponsored jointly (with Rochester Safety Council and the Industrial Management Council) a triennial Genesee Valley Safety Conference.

    January 4, 1967 (Board of Directors Meeting - U of R Faculty Club) The Board approved several new membership applications, among them, Richard E. Rice of RG&E. The Board received word that RIT President, Dr. Mark Ellingson was pleased that the RES had accepted RIT’s offer to lease the Krenzer Barn on its Henrietta Campus, and that the architect’s plans for its renovation should be available for review at the February Board meeting.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (January 1967)
    This issue announced plans for a tour of Eastman Kodak’s Hawk- Eye Works, including a tour and demonstration entitled, “Microfilm Equipment & Techniques as Applied to Engineering.” A six-week course entitled, “Computers and Engineers – Today and Tomorrow,” sponsored by the Rochester Chapter of IEEE, was announced, to be held on Thursday evenings at East High School; students were invited at a reduced rate of $5. The RES announced that the popular, yet intense, eight-week course, “Efficient Reading,” taught by RIT’s Prof. A.B. Herr, would again be offered on Tuesday evenings at the RIT, 50 West Main Street facility. The RES Education Committee announced an upcoming special evening seminar series on the economic factors of engineering management, to be taught by David S. Greenlaw, Assistant Comptroller of Eastman Kodak’s Kodak Park Works.

    February 1, 1967 (Board of Directors Meeting - U of R Faculty Club) The Board approved thirteen new membership applications, and it also approved the application of the Monroe Professional Engineers Society to become an Affiliate of the RES. The Budget Committee reported that it appeared that the Society would have a deficit of $8,000 for the coming year due to several factors; low registration for the educational courses, the recent purchase of Engineers’ Week display panels for the exhibit at Midtown Plaza and disappointing profits from The Rochester Engineer. It was recommended that dues be increased, 100 additional Sustaining Members be enrolled, and that additional Participating Companies be secured.  The decision was made to pursue additional Sustaining Members and Participating Companies, before any steps would be taken to increase the RES dues. The Engineers Center Committee reported that it was the consensus of the RES Affiliates that an Engineers’ Center would be best if it is run by the RES, rather than a consortium of Affiliates. It was further reported that, from the architect’s plans for renovation of RIT’s “Krenzer Barn” it should be expected that the RES should anticipate an annual operating cost of $35,000 for this completed facility. Toward meeting this challenge, the Committee further recommended that the RES appoint a special committee to organize a campaign to enroll 2,000 new members.

    “The Rochester Engineer” (February 1967)
    This issue announced that Clarence L.A. Wynd, Vice President of Eastman Kodak and General Manager of Kodak Park Works would deliver an address, “An Engineer’s Thoughts on Management Philosophy,” at the 1967 Engineers’ Joint Dinner, at the Chamber of Commerce. Tickets for this event would be $6. It was announced that two Engineers’ Center sub-committees had been formed; one to survey the RIT “Krenzer Barn” for soundness and suitability and a second to gather input from the community’s engineering and technical organizations as to their specific needs for using such a facility. Editor’s note: Constructed by J.T. Wells & Sons in 1908, this unique gothic truss barn has served RIT in recent years as a “Climbing Barn” for the college’s Outdoor Education Program.

    Subsequent articles in this series will describe the RES' continuing outreach to other technical societies as it considered its role in this and the larger community, along with more of the activities of the RES as it moved to be of greater service to its membership, especially those suffering from current economic crises, and adopted a greater role in shaping the future of the City and its environs. Noted also, will be the contributions made by RES members in the struggle to meet the challenges coming out of World War II, as well as a hoped-for period of post-war growth and prosperity. These articles will also feature an impressive array of RES activities in support of post-war re-emergence of Rochester area industry.

    We welcome your questions and comments on this series.

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